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Welcome to the Kelvin Valley

Come back and visit us again from time to time
to learn more about this lovely part of Bonnie Scotland. 

Kelvin Valley Railway

The Kelvin Valley Railway used to run between Kilsyth and Maryhill (in Glasgow) with linkages to other local lines. It was opened in June 1878 and had a short independent life before it was absorbed by the North British Railway in August 1885. Although both passengers and freight were carried, it was the transport of coal to the Glasgow docks and the Lanarkshire Steel works that proved most lucrative. It was built in the 1870s following an Act of Parliament of 13th July 1876 and by 1880 was open for both passengers and freight. It remained open until April 1966.

The Route

Kilsyth (Old) Station was the original terminus of the Kelvin Valley Railway but it was closed when the Kilsyth and Bonnybridge Railway was opened. Kilsyth swimming baths now occupy its site. The Kilsyth and Bonnybridge Railway ran east from Kilsyth to Bonnybridge and onwards. It was jointly operated by the North British Railway and the Caledonian Railway.

Kilsyth Junction was the point where the Kilsyth and Bonnybridge Railway left the original Kelvin Valley Railway. There was a small locomotive shed north of the junction.
 
Bairds of Gartshore's coal sidings were the principal source of traffic and wealth for the railway.

Twechar Station, which is now a private house, was also known as "Gavell" and had storage sidings.

At Kelvin Valley East Junction the railway crossed the Lenzie, Kirkintilloch to Blanefield route of the Campsie Branch of the Edinburgh and Glasgow railway with a joining link.

Both Torrance Station and Balmore Station had a single platform. The line then passed Balmore Colliery, Bardowie Station and Summerston Station before passing the Blackhill Brickworks on its way to Kelvin Valley Junction (which is close to the site of the new Summerston station). It finally joined the main line (on the former Glasgow, Dumbarton and Helensburgh Railway) near Maryhill Park Station which has been demolished and replaced by the new Maryhill Station.
 

Material Copyright © 2000 - 2005 DGR

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